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Nursing Home and Medicaid

Last post 03-30-2012 11:50 PM by desi. 15 replies.
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  • 03-01-2009 4:34 PM

    • lmbaum
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 03-01-2009
    • Posts 3

    Nursing Home and Medicaid

    I am currently at my wits end.  We live in Cincinnati, Ohio.  My mother has alzheimer's disease with other co-morbid conditions (heart disease, severe arthritis, etc).  I cared for her in her home for approximately 5-6 years.  In October of 2007 it was no longer safe for me to keep her at home so after a hospital stay for a UTI, my siblings and I made the decision for permanent placement.  At the time she was under a medicare HMO and placement was based on an in-network facility to cover her initial post hospitalization.  After she was no longer covered by her medicare HMO benefits, the social worker at the nursing home suggested converting her over to traditional medicare which I did.  I am the youngest of her 3 children, the closest to my mother and a nurse so therefore a lot of the decision making has fallen into my lap. 

     In late winter 2008 we started the medicaid application process which included placing her home up for sale.  Her home finally sold in July of 2008 and the proceeds (which weren't much) paid for the pending nursing home bill and all the other outstanding medical bills as well as some final bills from her home.  I had to find other living arrangements because naturally with the sale of the house I no longer had a home to live in.  This was essentially the last of my mother's assets outside of a $3,000 life insurance policy that I had to jump through hurtles and climb mountains to get the insurance company to even communicate with me about because of HIPAA regulations (that in this case I feel have been taken too far!) much less to finally cash out.  During this entire battle with the insurance company over this measily policy, medicaid continued to deny her eligibility even though her mounting bills exceeded $40,000+++.  They would not approve her with a spenddown.  She was denied.  Then once the house was sold and I began distributing the money I was reluctant to let go of the remaining $10,000 to the various healthcare providers until someone could guarantee me that medicaid would approve her once those checks were released or at least approve her with a $10,000 spenddown until those checks cleared the bank.  Again - denied until the money was gone.  Even though by the fall of 2008 she had already acrued close to $28,000 in bills between the nursing home, additional hospital stays, medications, etc.  Much more money was needed to go out then what was available but medicaid still denied.  So I finally mailed all of the checks by the end of 2008 knowing that there was no more money once those checks from the $10,000 remaining from the sale of her home cleared the bank.  Throughout all of this I was pushed to my limits, tired of arguing with various people and no one able to answer any questions and ended up just going into avoidance mode and essentially refused to speak to anyone.  Emotionally I had become a wreck.

     In January 2009 the nursing home sent me a letter stating that they were going to move my mother to another nursing home due to lack of payment and my being "uncooperative in securing medicaid." (uh - hello!)  I received this letter 4 days prior to the scheduled move date because they sent it to the address of the house that was sold and not to my current address.  The transfer was blocked by paying them her social security money that had come in December and January which completely drained her assets entirely.  On February 25th, 2009 I received a call from the new administrator at the nursing home inquiring as to what arrangements I intended on making to cover my mother's $34,000 nursing home bill because medicaid was only going to approve her beginning with January 2009.  When I questioned her about the medicaid approval and the social security money paid to them in January (no one - not medicaid nor the nursing home had informed me that my mother's application was even approved) she was unable to tell me exactly why medicaid wasn't doing a retro-approval or if the money paid in January had been deducted from the balance but wanted to know how I was going to pay her outstanding bill. 

    My question - my mother has been completely without assets since the sale of her home in July 2008.  The money had been utilized to pay the nursing home their current bill at that time and the remainder to cover her outstanding medical/house bills.  As being her POA and the person who signed all of the paperwork admitting her to the nursing home, can they make me personally responsible for the balance of this bill - $34,000?  She has no money or assets - the house was sold, her only life insurance policy was cashed out.  No money was hidden.  No money was shuffled around.  My mother was a widow from the age of 49, struggled by on going back to work and living on a basic clerical income and still had a young teen in the home at the time.  There were no investments - her small IRA was cashed in to pre-pay her funeral expenses.  Am I now responsible and going to have to pay the $34,000 + other pending medical bills from during that timeframe as well from my own pocket?  I don't have any more money than my mother did.  In fact - for the years that I was her primary caregiver, her social security income barely covered the cost of adult day stay so we utilized my income to help subsidize her social security to cover the household bills, medications and to put food on the table.

    Do I have to personally assume this nursing home debt on behalf of my mother?

    Any suggestions you could give would be deeply appreciated because to be truthfully honest I don't have the money and technically I am more valuable dead than alive at the moment.

     Leslie in Cincinnati

  • 03-02-2009 1:42 AM In reply to

    • mcrews
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 07-01-2008
    • California
    • Posts 138

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    leslie

    it depends.

    If you have signed everything as instructed in the POA document, then no. Most poa docs will state how to sign. for example"Mary J Smith, Leslie Jones, Attorney in Fact" Where Mary is the actual person and the second name is the person acting for the actual person. I see facilities telling the POAs, 'oh just sign your own name". At that point, there is personal responsibility.

    in CA, we have a FAIR HEARING process after a denial.  the fairhearing judge is a Medi-Cal worker w/ years of experience.  THey usually will see the error by the worker and facilitate a correction.  In CA, Medi-Cal doesnt keep hard stats on apps but are VERY aware of the cases that go to fair hearing. Those judges are very motivated to 'fix' the cases and get them cleared and off their desk.

    Hopefully, someone in Ohio might have more specific details. 

  • 04-29-2009 2:27 PM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Leslie, Man I feel your pain!!  First of all, take yourself off as your Mom's POA. That is never a good idea. What you should be is her "Representative". This does not leave you with all of her bills and responsibilities, it just gives you the right to make decisions for her. You will have the right to sign anything for her and do for her, but you will not have the final bills fall on you. Second of all, call the medicaid department and let them know of your new status, then all of the other people holding their hands out to you. Since your Mom is proably over the age of 65, she is also intitled to Medicare, which is Federally funded. This will provide her with better options of care. Third, take time for yourself and find some humor in what's going on, otherwise you'll be right beside her. Confused

    Kathy L.  in Houston, TX

  • 04-29-2009 3:00 PM In reply to

    • mcrews
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 07-01-2008
    • California
    • Posts 138

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    KATHY,

    You have NO IDEA what you are saying. STOP!!!!!!!

    1. Leslie said " In Oct 2007........under Medicare HMO" Her mother is ALREADY on MEDICARE. (please read post before posting)

    2. You said "First of all, take yourself off as your Mom's POA. That is never a good idea" Have you lost your mind!!!!!! that is easily the worst advise you can give. Her mother has Alzhiemers!!!!!!!! You can NOT just be a representative. 

    3. You said   "  This does not leave you with all of her bills and responsibilities, it just gives you the right to make decisions for her. You will have the right to sign anything for her and do for her, but you will not have the final bills fall on you.  This is completely incorrect. Final bills fall to the ESTATE not the POA. the POA document ends at death. so does the POA relationship. The executor of the estate takes over at death. 

    4. you said "This will provide her with better options of care."   She has Medicare. Medicare DOES NOT PAY custodial nursing home costs. MEDICARE only pays Rehabilitation. She has applied for Medicaid. They do pay for custodial care.

    you may not have understood her post, but your advise is harmful. If she were to drop the poa, the state would appoint a conservator.

  • 04-29-2009 9:16 PM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    NO YOU'RE INCORRECT!! I'm having to take care of my sister and I am her representative and not her POA by advise of my lawyers. She only  has Medicaid coverage as of now, which doesn't give her  any physical therapy to speak of, but when she becomes eligible for Medicare, I've been told she will become eligible for so much more. And Power of Attorney's are responsible for final bills, again I'm speaking on behalf of what has been advised to me here in Texas. And no I haven't lost my mind, ....YET, but give me a couple of days, I'm working on it. And You really need to be kinder to people, you never know what they are having to endure. Stick out tongue

  • 04-29-2009 9:54 PM In reply to

    • lmbaum
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 03-01-2009
    • Posts 3

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Ok guys - I appreciate your help but let me share what I have since found out from a lawyer who specializes in Elder Law here in the state of Ohio.  I was able to speak with them via the help of a local arm of a seniors advocate group in the state of OH - ProSeniors.  In speaking with the lawyer, I cannot be held responsible for my mother's bills solely because I am her power of attorney.  The lawyer did state that the nursing home will continue to try to make me feel responsible but that I should simply tell them that she is completely out of assets (which they are aware since they are the ones assisting with the medicaid process) and that this is between them and the state of Ohio.

     From having attended various seminars specializing in alzheimer's care, etc., as well as having spoken with two different lawyers, I have learned that being her Power of Attorney is the best position for me to be.  I don't know how the laws work in other states but for the state of Ohio and neighboring states of Indiana, Kentucky, etc., POA for financial and POA for healthcare are absolutely necessary when dealing with situations involving my mother.  The financial POA gives me the ability to handle her finances, etc., if she is not able (which because of her progressing alzheimer's she cannot truly understand the ramifications of financial decisions) and the POA for Healthcare allows me to speak on her behalf when she is unable. 

    The situation has improved from the standpoint that I haven't received any further calls from the nursing home regarding her outstanding bill, according to the nursing home she has now been approved for medicaid (even though I have yet to receive anything confirming this from Ohio Dept of Jobs and Family Services) and her overall health has remained stable.  As for medicare - Medicare (traditional or HMO commercial plans) work for providing coverage for acute inpatient care (hospitalizations) under Part A and Part B covers eligible outpatient care such as physicians, certain testing, therapies, etc.  Just because someone has medicare does not mean that they are automatically covered for skilled care (such as a nursing home).  Yes medicare does have a skilled care benefit however just like any other insurance provider, you have to meet skilled care medical necessity (such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, etc) after a hospitalization and they are limited to how long they will be covered.  After that timeframe has been met or it is felt that further therapy would not gain further progress, then medicare is no longer going to cover - the same as individual commercial healthcare policies.  Long term skilled care is considered custodial which then needs to be addressed under the state medicaid plans.  Federal only provides Medicare which should essentially be considered like a "health insurance" policy - there are limitations, medical necessity requirements and in certain situations precertification/preauthorization requirements.

     The unfortunate part in all of this is that with cutbacks nationwide taking place and then need to control national spending, this very vulnerable population is going to be very high risk.  We all want the best in care and want our parents to receive the best but with soaring healthcare costs, I'm just not sure where we as a country are going to get the funds to cover the extremely high costs of healthcare.  And big big dollars are needed each and every day just to support the healthcare and custodial care from a federal and state level to care for our elderly.  I wish I had the solution but I don't.  And I fear it's only going to get worse before it gets any better.

  • 04-29-2009 10:46 PM In reply to

    • mcrews
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 07-01-2008
    • California
    • Posts 138

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Medicare covers SKILLED nursing home. The word SKILLED is meant to denote "MEDICAL care" ie Rehabilitation and all that goes with it....thereapy etc.

    When someone is in a "SKILLED nursing home" (really the name is just misleading) for custodial care, like your mom, then Medicare doesnot pay for the daily rate.  There is no 'upto 100 days' .....it's is custodial, not Rehabilitation.

    So to suggest that you would get 'more options' is just not correct.

    I practice in Texas a& California nd I can assure you that if you donot have a POA for legal matters and a Health directive you are setting your self up for heartache.  When someone you are related to loses capacity, The only person that can speak for them must have those documents. wifes cant speak for a husband withuot those documents. If those documents are not in place, then the state will take 3-6 months to apponit a court supervised conservator.

    When some is poor and has nothing, Medicaid will have someone be their 'Representative" but the person HAS to have the capacity to name you.  If that person loses capacity you ONLY represent them infront of medicaid. Not at their bank and not at their doctors.

    A POA is the most important document someone can have.

    There would never have been a terri Shivo had she had a POA or Health Care directive.

    This is a major issue. It cant seem  to be ok for some and not ok for others. With the privacy laws 5 years ago, you have to have POA/ Health directives documents that have the privacy language.

    They are trained in the emergency room  how to deal with family members who do not have proper documents. If they can't find a family member with the right documents, then they call in the county to set up a conservetor.

    I may have seemed harsh, but it was for a reason.  I teach classes to attorneys on these topics so I have just a little bit of knowledge here.

     

  • 04-29-2009 11:31 PM In reply to

    • lmbaum
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 03-01-2009
    • Posts 3

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Mark - I'm not arguing with anything you have to say.  I'm actually a nurse who just left a position at a local hospital here in Cincinnati - my job of the past 11 years was in Utilization Review.  In other words, dealing with insurance carriers, medicare and medicaid.  Yes, there is a "skilled care" benefit to medicare and that benefit is activated when someone has been hospitalized under Medicare part A and requires a skilled level of care for progression of care.  However even if a nursing home patient is admitted to a hospital, if they meet the medicare requirements for medical necessity they could be eligible for the skilled benefits under their medicare policy at the time of hospital discharge for a limited time.  However many people don't understand the term "medically necessary" with their own healthcare plans let alone Medicare.  In either case people tend to think and assume because the doctor thinks they should stay in the hospital or because a short term stay in a nursing home is recommended, that the care will qualify for coverage when in fact it doesn't automatically mean that the definition for medical necessity is met and will be covered - whether by someone's commercial insurance or by medicare.  My mother has been hospitalized since she has become a permanent nursing home resident but due to debilitation acquired from her illness that required the hospitalization, she did meet the medicare standard/guideline to qualify for short term coverage to try to rehab her back to her pre-illness level of health.  I think that perhaps you and I are in a somantics juggle - from what you have indicated I am assuming that the legal perspective is defining the skilled care benefit as rehab.  In the medical community there is a big difference in the definitions of acute care, rehabilitation care and skilled care - the main definition difference between rehabilitation care and skilled care is that in acute rehabilitation units in the mid-west the patient has to be able to endure up to 3 hours of therapies a day where in the skilled care realm the therapy expectation isn't quite so intense.  So from the hospital Utilization Review and discharge planning perspective, we have three levels of care following acute inpatient care - acute rehabilitation care (intensive rehabilitation), skilled care (ie nursing home care with less intensive rehabilitation), and home health care.

    From also having worked in an ICU for 16 years, I really wish everyone had a medical power of attorney.  It's heartbreaking to see families torn apart trying to make decisions or having the ability to speak for the patient taken from them because legally they don't have the proper documents.  I encourage everyone, no matter how healthy and active you are, to denote someone as medical power of attorney over you in the event you end up unable to speak for yourself.  And make sure that person knows how you feel about end of life decisions, code status', feeding tubes, etc.  Don't just assume that someone knows what you want or don't want done!  SPEAK UP NOW - while you still can!!!  Make your wishes known and select someone who will stand by your choices even though other family members may not agree.  One of the most difficult situations I had to deal with was end of life decisions for a patient - he clearly spelled out in a living will and medical power of attorney what he did and didn't want and named his one sister his medical POA.  The problem was that he had 3 other sisters who felt differently and made it very difficult for the one sister who was trying to abide by his wishes.  She ended up caving into the other sister's wishes instead of standing up for what her brother wanted because the siblings were making life so extremely difficult for her - it was almost a living hell for her.  (Ohio doesn't have a lot of teeth in their laws surrounding living wills like other states).  Find someone who will be strong and be your advocate!!!!  If you have to go outside of the family and select a friend who won't necessarily have the issues of sibling pressure but would be able to stand up for you against them if it came down to it then do it!  It's your voice that needs to be heard - find someone who will shout it from the mountain tops if necessary!!!!  Don't just automatically assume that because you are siblings or in the same family that you have the same beliefs regarding end of life type care issues.  It's always better for you and for your family to have these discussions long before you need to utilize the information!  It's better for you and it's better for them!  Don't be left out in the cold, lying in an ICU bed and relying on an ethics board made up of strangers trying to decide what may be in your best interest.

  • 06-29-2009 1:03 AM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Hi- I am a nursing home administrator in the state of Kansas.  Yes, Medicare does provide coverage in the hospital, but also does cover skilled nursing after a qualifying hospitalization of 3 consecutive midnights (in other words a person over 65 who is eligible for Medicare who has been admitted to the hospital and stayed there three nights overnight is eligible with a Dr.'s order to receive the "Skilled" benefit provided by Medicare.  Now, first there are many "qualifications" that need to be met here.  First, the individual has to be admitted at the hospital.  Lately, so many hospitals are just putting patients in "observation" and not giving them admitted status.  This will not qualify them to use the skilled benefit with Medicare.  Secondly, a Dr. has to write the order to admit to skilled care.  The word "skilled" has many definitions.  Skilled can be Occupational, Physical and/or speech therapy or it can also mean "services provided by nursing staff" hence the word "skilled".  This means that even though an individual may not need PT, OT, and /or speech therapy they are still eligible to receive nursing care with medication management and observation for a short period of time, we're talking 14 days or less with the proper documentation from nursing staff.  Now, If a patient does need PT, OT, or speech therapy they can receive these benefits with the following criteria: Dr.'s order admitting to skilled care, able to participate in therapy and meet goals set forth by the therapy staff and make measurable progress toward those goals according to the Medicare guidelines.  Medicare will pay 100% of the skilled nursing home stay for the first 20 days of the patients stay (remember not all nursing homes are Medicare certified and able to offer this service under Medicare).  On the 21st day of the stay Medicare will only pay 80% of the stay and the patient is responsible for the remaining 20%.  Now, if a patient has a Blue Cross policy or some other secondary policy that will pick up that 20% co-pay then there would be no cost to the patient, but if there is no other insurance the patient would be responsible for the 20%...sometimes that can be $150.00  a day or more!  Now as the patient progresses and rehabs there are goals being set and recorded every week and Care plan meetings scheduled with the families to  communicate progress.  Now, a person who has had that qualifying hospital stay and is meeting goals set forth for them in therapy and still has a medical need to stay at the facility could technically receive 100 days of these services...not just the therapy but the nusing care being provided.  But, just so you know, the average length of stay for rehab is less than 30 days typically.  A person can keep qualifying through this goal setting and reporting process for the full 100 days that is allowed by Medicare.  Now, here is the tricky part.  If a person has bee to the hospital stays his qualifying admitted nights and goes to skilled nursing for rehab and goes home after say 10 days, then he has to either  1stay healthy and not be in the hospital for 60 consecutive days (called a wellness period) before he can qualify for another benefit period with hospitalization (100 days) or 2has to return to the nursing facility within 30 days of his admission date to the nursing home to keep using the first 100 days he qualified for.  So, if you go to a nursing home for rehab, make sure you don't check yourself out too soon or before the therapists are done working with you because you'll have to stay healthy for 60 days or possibly return back to the NH within that 30 day window to continue services.  WOW so complicated.  

    Okay,  now that Medicare benefits are hammered out and clear as mud right?  We move on to POA. I'll post more tomorrow night on that.

    Thanks,

    Acotton 

  • 02-15-2011 11:47 AM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Mr. Crew,

    My father has recently moved to a nursing facility in Richardson, TX. I live in Virginia and my brother who is trying to navigate all the issues lives in Richardson, TX. He does have Medicare and a Social Security payment. But, the facility costs more than he can afford. He owns a home and has approximately 25,000.00 in cash and IRA. He is 76 yrs. old and has a nuerolgical and pysical disability. He is unable to stand, walk and is incapable of making decisions. Would he be eligable for Medicaid or any other financial assistance and would he be required to sell his home or would he be able to rent the home to preserve the assets and have an income to assit with the facility costs?

     

    Thank you! for your time and effort,

     Craig

  • 02-16-2011 12:04 AM In reply to

    • mcrews
    • Top 10 Contributor
    • Joined on 07-01-2008
    • California
    • Posts 138

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Craig,

    Yes is the simple answer.

    the net rental income would count toward his share of cost along with his ss. He would need to 'spend' the 25k.  He could pay your brother in a care contract.  Eventually, the home would be recovered against.  Texas is very strict.  If you would like, contact me and we can discuss more specific details.

  • 04-19-2011 5:23 PM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    mcrews,

    great advise about how to sign docs...i'm new here so bare with me. my mom is in a nurs. fac. in SC. I live in NY. my 2011 started by driving straight down to find my mom in CCU in orangeburg, SC. She resided in Hampton, SC but upon arrived to ER in hampton, she was in rhennal failure, and there were no nephralogist (sorry about the spelling) on the weekend was rushed to a sister hospital. her body was shutting down...long story long, she did recover...almost. She needed rehab, and as mentioned by others here have said, Medicare wouldn't cover rehab except in a skilled nursing fac. So, she went to a nurs. home near her home, that she used to visit every week to visit all the "shut ins" as she called them.

    This is what I am trying to get to. Whe had set-backs...C-Diff (for whoever may know what I'm talking about)...she exceeded her 100 with Medicare and they cut her off, and it switched over to Medicade, which now is taking all over her SSI check, save $30. So  no Ph. Therapy. I think I have no choice but to move her up here to me, but am trying to figure out where to place her. Her SSI check is under $700, but at least would help with assisted living, But I don't know what those rates are on Long Island, and if it's even a possibility. As it stands now, after spending two and half months in SC, my husband (PhD w/ 6 figure job) being laid off end of Jan. I came back up to try to take care of my family and myself, with my own health issues. She's down there w/ no phone in her room, I'm up here trying to figure out how to move her up here somewhere, when she can travel, still has diarrhea since first of Jan., empty out and close her appt..................you get the idea! help! does anyone k now any answers to my confusion?

    DEB

  • 05-20-2011 6:52 PM In reply to

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

     Mark,

    I was reading this website because i have a simular situation, although my mother has still not been approved they are trying to make me remove her from the facility she is currently in. We have NO money left of hers and still are denied. They want 15,000.00 by tuesday and private pay from there on out. I dont understand why medicaide keeps dening us. They think we have property that we do not have. What can i do, I have 2 children work daily and cannot take care of my mother, she need full time care. What will happen to her if i cannot pay this or take care of her?? I am at my wits end with medicaide, we have sent them over 350 pages of doucements, that sometimes they say they dont have and we had already sent them time and time again..HELP. Susie


  • 08-09-2011 4:52 AM In reply to

    • Naveed
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    • Joined on 08-09-2011
    • Posts 2

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

     Hey man, This is same situation to me arround about 1 year ago. One day my friend told me a site. I contact to them. They provide all the fecilities with minimun cost. You should try once http:// Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} www.placementhotline.com/

  • 12-27-2011 8:07 PM In reply to

    • pjkids
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on 12-28-2011
    • Posts 1

    Re: Nursing Home and Medicaid

    Im seriously about to lose my mind. I tried to apply for Medicaid for my mom in March of 2011. Here is the history. I have cared for both my mom and dad for the past 8 years. My dad finally passed away 3 years ago and my mom was living on her own, though she was having bouts of passing out, along with the beginning stages of Alzheimers. In Nov. 2009, she passed out and ended up breaking her ankle. She ended up in a rehab for a few months, and then I decided to bring her home with me because i was too afraid she would pass out and break something else on her own. So she came to live with us around Jan of 2010 and was with us for about a year. She had 9 episodes of passing out while with us, three which required her to go to the ER via ambulance. One time she almost died. She was unconscious for about 9 minutes. Finally, the last time she passed out, she went to the ER and was admitted. I told the doctor I cannot handle much more. It was too overwhelming having her at my house with this happening, never mind trying to take care of my husband and 4 children. Also, her Alzheimers was getting worse ( It seemed like every unconscious episode, her memory got worse), she was pretty much bound to a wheel chair, she was starting to roam at night, etc. They agreed she needed 24 hour care. I got a note from her doctor stating that she needed to be in a home where she could get 24 hour care. So she was there for rehab for a few months, then I applied for Medicaid in March of 2010. At this point, she had no money. She has never owned a home, had no car, had nothing really to speak of. She had an annuity that was cashed out a few years back. Most of it went to nursing home payments for my dad, funeral expenses for both and she bought a few things for herself. So I applied for Medicaid for her and got everything the state asked for to them, except for the 5 years of the annuity. I tried to contact the company and they did not get back to me. So I told the case worker I had not heard back regarding the annuity, that maybe they can try and get some info from them. In July of 2011, the social worker at the nursing home called my case worker and was told "everything looks fine. we will contact her if we need anything" so I thought we were all set. In Oct. of 2011, I got a letting saying that if I did not get the annuity info to them in the next 5 days, she would be denied. I called them and told them I would try AGAIN. I got the info finally and got it to them but it was a few days late. I got a letting two days later saying she was denied. I called the nursing home and they gave me a number for a supervisor, because my case worker was on a temporary leave. The supervisor told me she would have the info sent to her and would contact me a week later. That was a month ago. So I finally got a call from the business woman at the nursing home. She was very nice and said she would try and email the supervisor to see if she could get anywhere. She told me she would get back to me which she did and told me I had to re apply! Two days later (today) I got a registered letter from admissions saying she is being discharged!!! DISCHARGED TO WHERE?? I DONT KNOW!!! I cannot take care of her. She is 87, in a wheel chair, still passing out, not sure of who any of us are anymore. I now have a job so no one is home. She cannot be alone. They told me in my letter she is being discharged for failure to pay and for failure to follow through with medicaid. ???? She has paid $1500 each month (her social security and her small pension she gets and is all she has) and I did everything Medicaid asked me to do?? I dont know where to turn and I dont have the money for a lawyer. I am her POA for healthcare. Can they come after me? or force me to take her back home with me??
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